Upcoming Events

Logic Colloquium

February 24, 2017, 4:10 PM (60 Evans Hall)

Sean Walsh
Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science, University of California, Irvine

Realizability Semantics for Quantified Modal Logic

In 1985, Flagg produced a model of first-order Peano arithmetic and a modal principle known as Epistemic Church’s Thesis, which roughly expresses that any number-theoretic function known to be total is recursive. In some recent work ([1]), this construction was generalized to allow a construction of models of quantified modal logic on top of just about any of the traditional realizability models of various intuitionistic systems, such as fragments of second-order arithmetic and set theory. In this talk, we survey this construction and indicate what is known about the reduct of these structures to the non-modal language.

References: [1] B. G. Rin and S. Walsh. Realizability semantics for quantified modal logic: Generalizing Flagg’s 1985 construction. The Review of Symbolic Logic, 9(4):752–809, 2016.

Logic Colloquium

March 24, 2017, 4:10 PM (60 Evans Hall)

Françoise Point
FNRS-FRS (UMons)

Title TBA

Logic Colloquium

April 07, 2017, 4:10 PM (60 Evans Hall)

Pierre Simon
Assistant Professor of Mathematics, UC Berkeley

Title TBA

Alfred Tarski Lectures

April 10, 2017, time TBA (room TBA)

Lou van den Dries
Professor, Department of Mathematics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Title TBA

Alfred Tarski Lectures

April 12, 2017, time TBA (room TBA)

Lou van den Dries
Professor, Department of Mathematics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Title TBA

Alfred Tarski Lectures

April 14, 2017, time TBA (room TBA)

Lou van den Dries
Professor, Department of Mathematics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Title TBA

Logic Colloquium

April 21, 2017, 4:10 PM (60 Evans Hall)

Jana Marikova
Assistant Professor of Mathematics, Western Illinois University

Title TBA

May 05, 2017, 9:30 AM (Location TBA)

Denis Hirschfeldt, Ehud Hrushovski, Michael Rathjen, John Steel

Logic at UC Berkeley

A two-day conference in mathematical logic and related areas organized by The Group in Logic and the Methodology of Science at UC Berkeley (logic.berkeley.edu). The conference is partly occasioned by the fact that the Group in Logic turns sixty next year.

In 1957, a group of faculty members, most of them from the departments of Mathematics and Philosophy, initiated a pioneering interdisciplinary graduate program leading to the degree of Ph.D. in Logic and the Methodology of Science. The Group has fostered interdisciplinary work in which logic has interacted with mathematics, philosophy, statistics, computer science, linguistics, physics and other disciplines.

While mathematical logic at UC Berkeley cannot be identified only with the Group in Logic, the Group has played a vital role in Berkeley’s worldwide prominence in mathematical logic and significantly contributed to making Berkeley a mecca since the fifties for people interested in mathematical logic and its applications. A full list of all those researchers in logic who taught at UC Berkeley, or studied at UC Berkeley, or visited Berkeley for shorter or longer periods would result in a who’s who of mathematical logic.

While marking an important moment for logic at UC Berkeley, the conference will be forward looking rather than merely celebratory. We have invited eight internationally prominent scholars to talk about the future of mathematical logic in their respective areas of specialization.

The first day of the conference will have four invited speakers in the so-called “foundational” areas: set theory, model theory, recursion theory, and proof theory. The second day will have four invited speakers in areas where mathematical logic plays a prominent role, namely philosophy of logic and mathematics, formal semantics for natural languages, modal logic, and foundations of computer science. The line up is given below.

May 5

set theory: John Steel (UC Berkeley)

model theory: Ehud Hrushovski (Oxford University)

recursion theory: Denis Hirschfeldt (University of Chicago)

proof theory: Michael Rathjen (Leeds University)

May 6

philosophy of logic and mathematics: Jeremy Avigad (Carnegie Mellon University)

formal semantics for natural languages: Barbara Partee (University of Massachusetts at Amherst)

modal logic: Johan van Benthem (University of Amsterdam, Stanford University, Tsinghua University)

logic in computer science: Ronald Fagin (IBM Almaden Research Center)

May 06, 2017, 9:30 AM (Location TBA)

Jeremy Avigad, Johan van Benthem, Ronald Fagin, Barbara Partee

Logic at UC Berkeley

A two-day conference in mathematical logic and related areas organized by The Group in Logic and the Methodology of Science at UC Berkeley (logic.berkeley.edu). The conference is partly occasioned by the fact that the Group in Logic turns sixty next year.

In 1957, a group of faculty members, most of them from the departments of Mathematics and Philosophy, initiated a pioneering interdisciplinary graduate program leading to the degree of Ph.D. in Logic and the Methodology of Science. The Group has fostered interdisciplinary work in which logic has interacted with mathematics, philosophy, statistics, computer science, linguistics, physics and other disciplines.

While mathematical logic at UC Berkeley cannot be identified only with the Group in Logic, the Group has played a vital role in Berkeley’s worldwide prominence in mathematical logic and significantly contributed to making Berkeley a mecca since the fifties for people interested in mathematical logic and its applications. A full list of all those researchers in logic who taught at UC Berkeley, or studied at UC Berkeley, or visited Berkeley for shorter or longer periods would result in a who’s who of mathematical logic.

While marking an important moment for logic at UC Berkeley, the conference will be forward looking rather than merely celebratory. We have invited eight internationally prominent scholars to talk about the future of mathematical logic in their respective areas of specialization.

The first day of the conference will have four invited speakers in the so-called “foundational” areas: set theory, model theory, recursion theory, and proof theory. The second day will have four invited speakers in areas where mathematical logic plays a prominent role, namely philosophy of logic and mathematics, formal semantics for natural languages, modal logic, and foundations of computer science. The line up is given below.

May 5

set theory: John Steel (UC Berkeley)

model theory: Ehud Hrushovski (Oxford University)

recursion theory: Denis Hirschfeldt (University of Chicago)

proof theory: Michael Rathjen (Leeds University)

May 6

philosophy of logic and mathematics: Jeremy Avigad (Carnegie Mellon University)

formal semantics for natural languages: Barbara Partee (University of Massachusetts at Amherst)

modal logic: Johan van Benthem (University of Amsterdam, Stanford University, Tsinghua University)

logic in computer science: Ronald Fagin (IBM Almaden Research Center)